Carlyle was wrong then, and he’s more wrong now. Forced labor will not solve society’s problems.


britishsoldierIrishcivilian

The English used to be no worse than anyone else.

Then Cromwell rose to power, and Britain became Perfidious Albion.

I don’t hate England and Englishmen. I hate Perfidious Albion and limeys. It’s an important distinction.

G. K. Chesterton was an Englishman. Cromwell was a limey. The difference is huge.

I don’t have a detailed opinion on Carlyle, yet, but it looks like he was wrong about a lot of things, starting with his high opinion of Cromwell, and his low opinion of the Irish.

Social Matter quoted Carlyle, from his pamphlet exhorting the Irish to sell themselves into slavery for the promise of eventual wages and emancipation. A sample of the pamphlet follows:

My indigent unguided friends, I should think some
work might be discoverable for you. Enlist, stand drill; become, from a
nomadic Banditti of Idleness, Soldiers of Industry! I will lead you to
the Irish Bogs, … In the Three Kingdoms, or in the
Forty Colonies, depend upon it, you shall be led to your work!

“To each of you I will then say: Here is work for you; strike into it
with manlike, soldier-like obedience and heartiness, according to the
methods here prescribed,–wages follow for you without difficulty; all
manner of just remuneration, and at length emancipation itself follows.

http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/1140/pg1140.txt

Everything quoted there, starting from the words “I will lead you,” is a lie. Carlyle was not going to lead anything or anyone. Carlyle was intent on writing and talking, not doing, but if his words moved anyone to action, the only actions would be defrauding and stealing and selling into slavery. Carlyle did not fight, he did no hard labor, and he did not lead by example, unless your life is so boring that an essayist can lead you by example. Frederick “Hotwheels” Brennan is more of a virile leader than Carlyle ever was, and Hotwheels is a cripple.

Carlyle was a parasite, and he was attempting to rouse British people to enslave Ireland. Maye he actually hoped that British plutocrats would get Irish serfs hooked on starvation wages, but Carlyle wasn’t planning anything in for the long-term good of the Irish.

The British Empire worked mostly because it used the British people as cannon fodder for opium-dealing schemes led by non-British plutocrats.

If you want a hard man to serve as your hero or anti-heroic idol, don’t take Carlyle or his opium-dealing patrons. Take someone like Andrew Carnegie, or Robert Falcon Scott, or Captain James Cook or Charles Darwin. They were sinners, but at least all of them were capable of leading by example and taking the initiative.

Now, in the present day, Social Matter has the misguided notion that Carlyle’s vision of serfdom and slavery can improve countries such as Canada and the USA.

Social Matter wrote:


John Nuttall, and his wife Amanda Korody. Basically, they were rather derelict recovering heroin addicts on welfare who had fallen from street-punk anarchism into radical terrorist Islam. They wanted to attack and destory Canadian society in a Boston Marathon Bombing style attack, or possibly shoot rockets at parliament, or take a train hostage, or steal a submarine, or storm a military base with an AK-47. They couldn’t really decide, being somewhat mentally disordered.

But with the extremely patient help of Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) undercover agents, who had gotten wind of them after they had gone around talking with loose lips about their plans at local mosques and with friends, they were able to settle on a plan to bomb the British Columbian Parliament buildings with a pressure-cooker bomb loaded with RCMP-supplied “C4,” which was actually just modeling clay. Throughout the whole process, they were most of the time distracted and off-track, and often forgot what the plan even was, though they eventually “succeeded” in building and placing the “bombs.”

The RCMP were trying to get a terrorism convinction. They recorded the whole thing, and very carefully tried not to directly influence Nuttall and Korody so as to avoid an entrapment ruling, though they definitely influenced them,…

For these particular poor souls, they could be put to work for example, not on planning to blow up Parliament with a fake bomb, but on building hiking trails…”

John Nuttall As Soldier Of Industry

I doubt that fools of Nuttall’s type would ever build a hiking trail if the cops and judges and authority figures told them to do it.

These fools might build hiking trails if some hippie drug dealer urged them on, but the hiking trails would probably be unfit for use.

Modern Western societies really suck at forcing people to do profitable, productive work.

Prison labor exists, but modern Western governments don’t have enough legitimacy and brainpower to put everyone into profitable forced labor camps.

The USA imprisons a lot of people, but the taxpayers subsidize that. A few fat cats get rich, not because prisoners are good laborers, but because taxpayers subsidize prison labor. If the USA’s prisons were truly profitable, 99% of the USA’s population would be incarcerated, and the remaining 1% would serve as guards reporting to a foreign warden – perhaps George Soros.

Wal-Mart makes profits not because it is efficient, but rather because taxpayers subsidize the food stamps of Wal-Mart workers. If those workers were denied their food stamps, they would have to quit Wal-Mart and seek some less regular work.

The police catch mentally ill fools who dream of bombing, not because such fools present a threat, but because the police subsidize the fools with fake bombs. Juries support the police, not because the police are credible, but because judges subsidize entrapment by instructing juries to ignore the obvious.

For the moment, the USA will continue subsidizing its various satraps. In Afghanistan, the USA subsidizes the Pashtun analogs of Jimmy Saville so long as they can keep the opium flowing.

Do you want to be an obedient soldier for such an empire?

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