Stories That Change Behavior


quote:

 

you brought up Population Media Center. One of the things that we do – and that is the primary thing we do – is to use a strategy of communications that has turned out, from everything we have been able to measure, to be the most cost-effective strategy for changing behavior with regard to family size and contraceptive use on a per-behavior change basis of any strategy we have found on the planet. And this is the use of long-running serialized dramas, melodramas like soap operas, in which characters gradually evolve from the middle of the road in that society into positive role models for daughter education, delaying marriage and childbearing until adulthood, spacing of children, limiting of family size, and various other health and social goals of each country. And we have now done such programs in forty-five countries. And I can give you a couple of statistics.
For example, in northern Nigeria, a program we ran from 2007 to 2009 was listened to by 70% of the population at least weekly. It was a twice a week program. It was clearly a smash hit. And it was a smash hit because it was highly suspenseful and highly entertaining. But it had a storyline dealing with a couple deciding to use family planning, which is almost taboo in northern Nigeria because less than 10% of the people in that region use any modern method of contraception. We had eleven clinics have healthcare workers ask clients what had motivated them to come in for family planning, and 67% percent of them named the program as the motivation.
http://www.peakprosperity.com/podcast/80326/bill-ryerson


This is a topic that should become a keyword. Many stories are highly effective at changing behavior.

Science fiction and fantasy stories inspired many 20th-century children to become 21st-century technologists.

Neil Gaiman was quoted as follows at the link below:

http://mashable.com/2013/10/18/tech-fiction-reading/

I was in China in 2007, at the first party-approved science fiction and fantasy convention in Chinese history. And at one point I took a top official aside and asked him Why? Science fiction had been disapproved of for a long time. What had changed?

It’s simple, he told me. The Chinese were brilliant at making things if other people brought them the plans. But they did not innovate and they did not invent. They did not imagine. So they sent a delegation to the U.S., to Apple, to Microsoft, to Google, and they asked the people there who were inventing the future about themselves. And they found that all of them had read science fiction when they were boys or girls.


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2 Responses to Stories That Change Behavior

  1. Pingback: Vulture of Critique recommends: Pupipo~! | vulture of critique

  2. Pingback: The “moral of the story” and “moral injury” : Fictional atrocities, real atrocities, and interpretations of “good” and “bad” | vulture of critique

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